Blogger chooses blog over social life

When some friends asked Henry Fetter if he wanted to go partying, he told them “no.” He felt it was the only responsible choice for the dedicated blogger, since it had been twelve hours since his last posting.

Fetter, who keeps a simple personal blog filled with mild and often conflicting opinions on every day people and events, has been dedicated to the project for almost a year now.

“It started because I felt like I needed my opinion to be heard,” Fetter explains. “I wanted to have an opinion on everything- even things that didn’t require it.”

The blog has required a great deal of his time in maintaining, leaving very little time for socializing and making friends. “As a blogger, you have to really dedicate yourself to this online identity,” says Fetter. “Normal people can go out and make friends and maintain relationships. But bloggers aren’t normal people.”

Despite the fact that very few people read it, Fetter is certain it will be picked up by the mainstream media anytime and transform into a sensation. And he wants to be ready at all times for that possibility. Thus he remains in his room, sitting, typing away, and hoping someone in the cyber world will notice.

Upon losing access to the internet, girl discovers she has her own thoughts

While in the process of moving apartments, Dana Ollinger lost access to the internet for a few days. Between not living in her old apartment and waiting for the new services to be set up, she was in this prehistoric-like waiting period where she lost much of her modern ability to communicate and connect to the world.

Within a day or so, Ollinger started beginning to have strange thoughts. Ideas would simply pop into her head while she was wandering around her apartment. She would find herself writing down these ideas in a “journal”-a written version of an online blog that is meant to be kept “private,” which means for only one or a few select people.

As she began writing in this journal, she quickly realized that she was hearing her own voice within her head coming up with all sorts of things to include on the pages.

The strange part about the voice was that it was her own.

For as long as she could remember, Ollinger’s mind had been distracted by constant access to the internet and the world of ideas and thoughts that are included. She had become accustomed to listening to other people’s opinions and ideas. It had never occured to her that in the process, she lost touch with her own well of ideas and opinions.

That is, until she was forcibly removed from the chatterbox of the internet. Shocked to find that she had her own thoughts and opinions outside of the internet, she began to be truly inspired. She began writing more stories and creating fun story lines.

Last Wednesday, however, her internet was finally set up again and Ollinger found herself once again lose touch with that creative spark inside. Now that she knows her own thoughts are inside her, though, she hopes to keep off the internet a little more than she did before.

That is, of course, after she watches a series of related YouTube videos and comments on them for an hour or two. Or five.

Smileychik33 shocks YouTube community by leaving neutral video comment

Adele, a 16-year-old honors student from Milwaukee, regularly watches YouTube videos like most kids her age. While watching the videos, she signs in as “smileychik33”, and often comments on each video after watching it.

“It’s clearly very important to have an opinion about each video you watch, and to share that opinion with the entire world,” she says. She explains that youth have grown up knowing how important it is that they share their voice and opinion with the rest of of the world by leaving comments and rating certain videos, no matter what endlessly shifting criteria they choose to use to rate them.

“Usually, you either write “LOL” or some combination of letters that make it obvious you’re laughing hysterically if you like the video, or you write something scathing and personally offensive,” Adele further explains. “The more you can personally insult both the people involved in the video project and the other people who have commented on it, the more effective your post is. Grammar, spelling, punctuation and factual evidence are not important.”

Last week, however, Adele-under her username “smileychik33”- decided to leave a comment under a video that was neither scathing nor a compliment. She simply wrote, “Watched it. Fine.”

Though the inclusion of the word “fine” may seem like she was approving of it, she assuredly answers that “fine” is neutral in the world of the internet. The attention-starved people who regularly put up and comment on videos need much more than “fine” to feel like their work has been approved of.

Her lack of opinion sent shockwaves throughout the YouTube community. A wave of other users immediately began to insult her neutrality, forcing her to take a side one way or another on the video so they could better come to rash decisions about how they felt about not only the video, but about her as a human being. After the wave of insults came another wave of users who defended Adele’s comment and retorted insults to those who were insulting her in the first place.

As the digital debate rages on, Adele remains neutral. “The video was fine. Nothing great, nothing horrible. Just fine. I refuse to add anything else to my comment,” she states.

For many YouTube users, however, her neutrality is “waiii not wiked kewl” and some consider her a “b^!@#”.

Onslaught of detailed tweets affirms water on outside window is rain

Charlene Grandview heard small taps on her outside window as she sat in her living room in Springfield, Illinois. As she looked at the window, there seemed to be some sort of watery substance that was hitting the window panes. Unsure where to look for further details on the mystery, she logged onto her trusty Twitter and began checking the Tweets of people she knew were local.

Many of the Tweets discussed rain or the rain they were hearing outside their window. Many of them used the rain as an excuse for not exercising or any number of other excuses for not doing a simple act. These numerous Tweets she read and responded to, affirmed for Hoffer that it was, in fact, raining outside her window.

“Sure, I could have just checked Weather.Com or logged on to my local online news source and found out if it’s raining in my area, but I figured Twitter would be more up to date than those sources,” Hoffer claims.

When asked if she considered simply stepping outside to see if it was raining or not, she looked befuddled and said, “But, I could get wet. Plus, I wanted to see what was trending at the time.”